Not Invented Here

Not Invented Here, or NIH, is one of the fatigue factors identified in the book Conquering Innovation Fatigue, overcoming the barriers to personal and corporate success. The authors do a good job of articulating why and how individuals and teams afflicted with NIH syndrome can impose significant barriers to innovation. Even though the concept of

“How do I best measure Open Innovation?”

I’ve been sharing some practical insights on Open Innovation that I’ve learned over the years. Many forward-thinking innovation executives are bringing their knowledge to the table as well, and from time to time I am sharing these as part of what we’re teaching at our upcoming CoDev 2015 Conference in Scottsdale, Ariz.  If you like

Changes

While shoveling snow this past week, the song Changes, from David Bowie came up randomly on my iPod. You know the song, Ch-ch-ch-changes, turn and face the strange. It got me thinking about today’s business environment and the challenges many businesses face, especially the small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). Change seems to be the

DSM Video: Open Innovation – Proudly Found Elsewhere

Check out this video below outlining Royal DSM’s approach to Open Innovation, entitled “Proudly found elsewhere.” Royal DSM’s Vice President of Open Innovation, Robert Kirschbaum, will be presenting at CoDev 2015 to discuss the cultural changes they think are key to their success and how DSM built its Innovation Engine for Growth, which Mega Challenges

Open Innovation Quick Tip #2:

How do you build a solid foundation for breakthrough OI?   Six big ideas: I am seeing more companies realize they need to innovate from the outside in. They recognize growth requires doing new things, not working on the same things competitors are working on. They can no longer just discover, develop and ship to create

New Era of Healthcare Highlights Need for Partnerships to Overcome the Value Gap

One of the most important areas for Open Innovation in the last decade has been in the field of healthcare. Wholesale changes in the way Americans consume healthcare have greatly fragmented and complicated the external market and especially the back end of the business side. Today patients must navigate intricate networks of providers and multiple